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Published on 09/11/2008 at 07:19AM .

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Published on 06/11/2008 at 07:19AM .

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  • Ned Batchelder: The first servers
    • The bit about optimizing area codes is fascinating. But here’s a quote about how phone switches predate web server farms: “It’s fascinating to realize that the work we do every day with web servers, which seems like a recent modern technology, was predated by guys like Erlang working with early phone switches over 100 years ago. Phone switches were the first servers: central machines connected to a large number of potential clients. In building these switches, the early engineers had to figure out from scratch how to anticipate the possible work load, so they could build switches large enough but not too large. The whole of queueing theory springs from the theories worked out by telephone switch engineers.”
    • Posted: Mon Nov 03 20:17:14 UTC 2008
  • EasyVMX!: Virtual Machine Creator
    • EasyVMX! is the simple and failsafe way to create complete virtual machines for VMware Player on the web. You can install any Windows, Linux, BSD or Solaris, and test LiveCDs in a safe environment.
    • Posted: Mon Nov 03 20:17:14 UTC 2008
  • Symbian OS Ruby port – Trac
    • Welcome to the Mobile Ruby Project Ruby 1.9 for Symbian OS is here! This is the place to find the latest source of Ruby 1.9 VM for Symbian OS 9.x
    • Posted: Mon Nov 03 20:17:14 UTC 2008

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Published on 04/11/2008 at 07:19AM .

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  • Praça São Lourenço
    • Very nice restaurant in Sao Paolo, Brazil.
    • Posted: Mon Oct 27 04:08:35 UTC 2008
  • The 10 Signs of Intellectual Honesty | The Design Matrix
    • “What you need to look for is a track record of intellectual honesty. Let me therefore propose 10 signs of intellectual honesty.” However, one note of caution I would put in there is that these points are valid only if the argument is well-reasoned and grounded to begin with. If your argument is grounded in factual relativism, that’s intellectually dishonest too.
    • Posted: Mon Oct 27 00:50:15 UTC 2008
  • Learn a dynamic language now – The Tripping Point – Pluralsight Blogs
    • Andrew, read this. Note that the person writing this is a long-time Microsoft consultant. “The common criticisms that dynamic languages aren’t understood by most developers and don’t work for large projects just don’t hold water. The lack of compiler (and some dynamic languages have compilers) is a non-issue to. The normal testing the compler does (and that’s the right way to think of it) is superceded by the better overall test coverage you can achieve. And while they may not be as fast as C# and Java (which weren’t as fast at C++ when they started), they scale fine if you’ve app’s architecture is solid (and a bad architecture will cripple scaling no matter what language you use).”
    • Posted: Mon Oct 27 00:23:31 UTC 2008

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Published on 27/10/2008 at 07:19AM .

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Published on 17/10/2008 at 07:19AM .

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Published on 14/10/2008 at 07:20AM .

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  • Axiom Stack – About
    • Quick Axiom Stack Facts * All scripting is done in server side ECMAscript (JavaScript) * Axiom Stack provides a unified object model to all content data * Built-in storage behaves like a transparent, hierarchical object database * TALE templating language, a clean and concise XML based attribute system for building templates * Javascript makes language impedance issues arising from AJAX disappear * Axiom Stack is secure by default – no programming needed * Includes everything that you need to build a web application
    • Posted: Fri Oct 10 15:18:55 UTC 2008

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Published on 11/10/2008 at 07:19AM .

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He’s said it before in many different ways, but I finally found a bunch of statements in a single posting of his that summarizes his what I think is very correct thinking about terrorism prevention:

The problem with building security around specific targets and tactics is that its only effective if we happen to guess the plot correctly. If we spend billions defending [target type A] and terrorists bomb [target type B] instead, we’ve wasted our money. If we focus on [event type X] and terrorists attack [event type Y], we’ve wasted our money.

[…]

The following three things are true about terrorism. One, the number of potential terrorist targets is infinite. Two, the odds of the terrorists going after any one target is zero. And three, the cost to the terrorist of switching targets is zero.

We need to defend against the broad threat of terrorism, not against specific movie plots. Security is most effective when it doesn’t require us to guess. We need to focus resources on intelligence and investigation: identifying terrorists, cutting off their funding and stopping them regardless of what their plans are. We need to focus resources on emergency response: lessening the impact of a terrorist attack, regardless of what it is. And we need to face the geopolitical consequences of our foreign policy.

In 2006, UK police arrested the liquid bombers not through diligent airport security, but through intelligence and investigation. It didn’t matter what the bombers’ target was. It didn’t matter what their tactic was. They would have been arrested regardless. That’s smart security. Now we confiscate liquids at airports, just in case another group happens to attack the exact same target in exactly the same way. That’s just illogical.

The problem is it’s much harder to make it look like you’re doing something so when the next attack comes you can say how much work you were doing protecting target type A and event type X, and the only way you could have prevented the attacks on target type B and event type Y would be more resources.

Published on 04/09/2008 at 06:23PM under . Tags , ,

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So I disagree with the way the argument in this post is framed, but I am glad to see the “mainstream” tech press realizing there’s a better way to get to SOA:

A growing number of companies are finding that lower-visibility Web-oriented architecture (WOA) developments, spawned through grassroots movements, are a better route to the service-oriented architecture. WOA, like SOA, is an architectural approach to system design, though WOA is resource-oriented rather than service-oriented. What’s the difference? While the core SOA design unit is a reusable service that fulfills a distinct business function, resource-oriented services are more limited and data-focused.

SOA and WOA work at different layers of abstraction. SOA is a system-level architectural style that tries to implement new business capabilities so that they can be consumed by many applications. WOA is an interface-level architectural style that focuses on the means by which these service capabilities are exposed to consumers. Governance, quality of service, security, and management are of equal importance, whether the functionality is being delivered via SOA or WOA.

I think the delineation between SOA design units as a service fulfilling a distinct business function and WOA as a resource-oriented service being more limited and data-focused is so much dissembling for SOA being an attempt to force a top-down, waterfall-based model on what services you offer in your architecture versus an iterative or even agile strategy of building the individual services and then gluing them together.

I think SOA was also overblown in the framework for tying them together, which is the root of this problem, and leads to the conclusion I made up above. Put a bunch of webservices out there that handle orthogonal responsibilities, make it easy to access them (personally, preferably with easy HTTP/POX or a light SOAP layer), rather than a huge management stack that services have to a priori fit into, with the up-front design and overhead that comes with it.

Published on 11/08/2008 at 07:21PM under . Tags , , , , , ,

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Published on 26/07/2008 at 07:19AM .

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